Posted tagged ‘The Lord of the Rings’

Not For LORD OF THE RINGS Fans Only

October 2, 2009



CLASH OF THE GODS: TOLKIEN’S MONSTERS airs Monday, October 5 10PM/9c on HISTORY.

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Why Middle-earth Matters

October 1, 2009

GandalfIf you’re a history and military buff like me, The Lord of the Rings is a story tailor made for you: two massive armies facing each other on the battlefield about to be locked in combat. Now…just substitute Patton for a wizard in flowing white robes, the Nazis for a hideous race of creatures called Orcs, and Europe for Middle-earth.

Okay, that’s a wee bit simplistic (and not actually accurate…although written in spurts between 1937 and 1952, Tolkien always said that Lord of the Rings should never be read as an allegory for World War II.)

But what is it that has caused The Lord of the Rings to have sold over 150 million copies and to be translated into almost 40 languages? For me, it’s that feeling of real history, which gives Lord of the Rings its life. JRR Tolkien was obsessive about documenting his universe with dates, family trees, maps and indexes….hell, he even threw in a creation story. If it wasn’t for the fact that the characters are elves, dwarves, hobbits and wizards you’d think you were submersed in a history textbook.

So in Clash of the Gods, the goal was to figure out where all this inspiration came from. Much of The Lord of the Rings is about good overcoming evil, and Tolkien’s devout Catholicism provides the backbone. Comparisons of Frodo’s quest to Christ are plainly seen, but I think the most interesting tidbits are the ones found in Beowulf and other Norse myths. Tolkien doesn’t really hide in lifting almost exactly scenes from classic tales. The transformation of Smeagol into the creature Gollum almost exactly mirrors a tale in the Norse Volsunga Saga; and scenes like Bilbo stealing a cup in The Hobbit are directly lifted from Beowulf.
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But more than any gods or monsters from ancient myth, I think it’s the personal pain that Tolkien suffered which gives The Lord of the Rings its foothold in reality. As a soldier in World War I, Tolkien was right in the middle of the action, watching friends killed and mutilated right in front of his eyes. When Tolkien writes about the same kind of suffering for Frodo there is a ring of truth that isn’t found in any other kind of fantasy writing.
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Ultimately, it doesn’t matter to me that Tolkien stole stuff from tales of the past…that’s pretty what all writers do. But what he did was to make it his own and transform it into something new. A feat which many writers attempt, but few do successfully.

So I’m off to re-read The Lord of the Rings…150 million people can’t be wrong.

– Ted Poole, KPI Writer and Producer

CLASH OF THE GODS: TOLKIEN’S MONSTERS airs Monday, October 5 10PM/9c on HISTORY.

Our Cool Movie Poster

July 29, 2009

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CLASH OF THE GODS premieres Aug 3 on HISTORY

July 22, 2009

Flying dragon

KPI’s new series CLASH OF THE GODS tackles myths–big gutsy, unwieldy myths filled with sex, snakes, sirens, flying dragons and monsters eating people. From Zeus to Hercules to Medusa, this is the kind of stuff you haven’t seen on TV because it is such an unruly beast to fell.
Producing a series of this magnitude involves huge international crews, large casts, makeup teams, cutting- edge special effects, a ton of planning & perseverance and the best people you can find to pull it all off.

Chris Cassel and Jessica Conway (two elder KPI statesmen/women) spent months shooting this series in North Africa, Lithuania, Sweden and beyond. Then back in NYC Kristy Sabat and Andrea Pilat began sifting through the plot lines with editors Jennifer Honn, Tova Goodman and William Miller.

This series was pre-scripted with a Lord of the Rings trilogy shoot-it-all-at-once approach. The style (sketch above) is a very intentional graphic novel blend with plenty of live action. The goal is to create a signature look for channel surfers.

First episode (Aug 3) is ZEUS–Ancient Greece’s most powerful god in an epic struggle against his father for control of the universe. Experts believe this myth may have been ancient code for a real world event – one of the greatest natural disasters the Earth ever experienced.

–Vinnie Kralyevich, KPI founder & CCO